One of the biggest errors that is in vogue today, is the idea that God doesn’t judge.  But is it any wonder?

We have a generation of young adults who had a great hand in raising themselves.  These are the ‘latchkey’ kids of not too many years past.  Kids who came home, after school, to an empty house because both parents were working.  These kids obtained freedom at a very early age.  The majority of their time was spent in school, and with their peers–and these were the dominant influences in shaping their perspectives.

Mom and Dad, in most cases, were lenient by default, because they simply couldn’t be there to see what their child was getting into.   And, to try to compensate their kids for their lack of involvement, and justify their absence, many gifts and opportunities were showered upon them.

But what has been the result of such parenting?  How has this shaped the perspective of these kids?  (I was not one of these children, but what follows are my opinions.)

I believe that these kids see authority as something that you can get around.  If you don’t leave a trail, you won’t get caught.  If you project success, you have a much better chance of convincing people that you are living uprightly.  But I believe a lot of these kids had, and still have, double lives–the outward life for authority figures to see, and the secret sinful life where they really live.

I believe these kids feel entitled to all things, just because they exist.  They believe they are entitled to success, prosperity, and happiness–because Dad and Mom bent over backwards to see that they had it.  I believe their family interactions centered around the lavishing of gifts upon them, and the ‘building of their self esteem’ (lest they realize that Mom and Dad were shortchanging them of something that is truly priceless–themselves, and their time).  In other words, I believe their family life was imbalanced and the time they spent with their parents was greatly skewed toward their gratification.

Now, is it any wonder that kids like this would believe that the world owes them a living?  Is it any wonder that they would believe that God lives merely to shine down upon them?  Is it any wonder that they believe it is God’s great pleasure to bring gifts to them and serve them?  After all, in their families, they were the masters and their parents were the servants . . .

And how could God possibly judge them?  They are used to having their ‘real life’ away from the prying eyes of Mom and Dad.  How they forget that God sees everything!  And, lest He should be angry with them about something–shouldn’t their arguments of self-justification appease Him?  (After all, Dad and Mom really didn’t want to be angry with them, and spoil those few hours they had together.  But, if that didn’t work, a few angry accusations to play upon their parents’ guilt would usually cause them to back off.)  If pushed, will they rail against God and hurl angry accusations at Him too?

We have a generation of young adults who have little comprehension of God’s diety, His authority, or His judgment.  Is it any wonder that they adopt false religions whose god portrays himself as a god of love, tolerance, and peace?  When this god begins to attack Jehovah, portraying Him as an angry, cruel, intolerant, judgmental being–is it any wonder that they will believe the lie?

I am not writing this to shame parents who raised their kids this way.  That issue is something for you to prayerfully take to God.  The point that I am trying to make is that sin always, eventually leads us into the devil’s camp.  We may not understand why God wants us to do things a certain way–but disobey, and let it play out for fifty years or so, and it will be evident why.

For those of you who still believe God is unbendingly strict, let me remind you: the devil prowls about like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.  Given that is the world into which we are born, does it not make sense that God would have many guidelines in place to keep us safe?  Sure, it hurts God when we disobey, when we step outside of the boundaries He has placed for us, when we are injured, or devoured–but WE are the ones who really lose.  We, and our children, and our children’s children . . .

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